Nepalgung, Nepal

Kesang Yudron first visited Nepalgunj as a high school student when her father wanted to reach out to the women of the area to train them in knitting. A typical teenager, Kesang didn’t think much of the experience at the time. After completing her accounting degree in Minnesota and working in a cubicle for a large company, however, she realized that she would rather serve her home community. She remembered the story of a 13-year-old village girl being rescued from trafficking by the police in the border town of Nepalgunj and wanted to provide an alternative to them. Kesang soon learned that thousands of young Nepali women are trafficked to India every year for prostitution, child labor, and slavery. Others are victims of domestic abuse. All had no jobs or wage-earning skills. In founding Padhma Creations, Kesang aimed to provide women artisans with health, education and social welfare programs. The company pays knitters wages that are higher than the market rate in Nepal and puts away 5% of profits towards the Padhma Creations Health Fund to provide knitters and their children with basic health care, an expense many Nepalis simply cannot afford. The company also provides education scholarships for children of the knitters

Padhma Creations not only helps these women but saves their families from a life of spiraling poverty.

Padhma Creations partners with nearly 70 women from neighboring villages of Nepalgunj, Bardiya, and Surkhet in Nepal. Wool is divided among their families who then make berets, scarves, socks, and other items in their homes or in shelters for women without homes.